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iAmClinic FAQs

As a LGBTQIA+-focused counseling practice, we are very familiar with developmental components, personal nuances, and hidden truths that inform gender identity. We not only listen to the experiences that you rely on, but we also identify the components of gender that might live under the radar. We take into consideration how gender develops in the brain, how it is expressed, and give our clients tons of space to explore with safety in a non-judgmental environment. We not only bring our professional experiences and academic know-how, but also our personal stories so that you don’t have to feel like the odd one out. 

Personal, safe, and non-judgmental therapy is the best. Although we like to talk about cognitive models, trauma modalities, or specific types of talk therapies, there isn’t one that fits everyone. We work in collaboration with our clients, making sure we address your concerns efficiently and confidentially. 

At iAmClinic we are a team of queer, trans, and allied therapists. We believe it is important that you work with someone who has not only walked in your shoes, but has also experienced the changes you seek. You have found a good trans therapist when they can speak from life experience in addition to their academic training. You should look for a therapist who does not need you to teach them about your trans experience, but one who knows because they share that experience with you.

Talk therapy is helpful in preparing for transitioning, process anticipated and unexpected challenges while transitioning, and can help provide the resources and support letters you need for your transition. We want to make sure that you are safe, prepared, informed, supported, resourced, and ready for your transition.

At iAmClinic we are a team of queer, trans, and allied therapists. We believe it is important that you work with someone who has not only walked in your shoes, but has also experienced the changes you seek. You have found a good queer or trans therapist when they can speak from life experience in addition to their academic training. You should look for a therapist who does not need you to teach them about your queer or trans experience, but one who knows because they share that experience with you. 

We often say that it is our job to work ourselves out of a job. In that light, therapy sessions are collaborations between you and your therapist. We first want to earn your trust by being safe, well-trained, and capable. As the therapeutic process takes shape, it becomes a working relationship, much like teamwork. We often provide psychological education on certain behavioral patterns or relational dynamics and provide safe feedback that will help you grow in a safe environment. We also take great pride in showing up authentically, so you’ll get to know your therapist as much as we get to know you. We affirm what research tells us time and time again: It is the therapeutic relationship that is most important. As a result, therapy sessions are more of a safe place to be challenged, to be heard, and to be allowed to be honest with how you show up in the world. 

The length of therapy deepens on what you would like to address and how deep you want to go. Many people like to address a specific issue, while others want to reach a new level of wholeness. Although a specific number of sessions cannot be determined, you can work closely with your therapist to get the most out of every minute you are with us.

We have a wide range of experienced therapists who offer a variety of price points. Depending on what you would like to address and how deep you’d like to go, therapy will range in price. If you’d like to set a free consultation with a therapist, they will help give you an anticipated range of the cost. 

Yes. Therapy, especially therapy with queer, trans, or allied therapists, can be helpful in giving you tools to cope with, desensitizing reactions, and finding confidence to deal with discrimination and stigma. We often act as advocates when it is appropriate and help you find resources that offer support and assistance. In terms of therapy, we can use modalities like EMDR or Breathwork to help you gain the skills and insights to help you stand firm in a heterosexist, cisgendered world.

In couples therapy the client is the relationship. We focus on how the couple, throuple, or polycule functions as a system, rather than competing individuals. In couples therapy you will learn about your relational patterns, tools to improve communication, and identify why unwanted behaviors keep surfacing. We always tell our clients, “It is our job to work ourselves out of job.” We don’t want you to figure out who is right or wrong. We want you to figure out how to repair your relationship without us in the room because that will lead to your relational success. 

Many relationships experience challenges related to their differing identities and all the implications they have in their social lives. Empathizing with one another’s experience in a productive way requires a healthy and sophisticated boundary system- one that takes practice and  the emergence of a stable self-confidence. From a sturdy internal knowledge that sits behind a healthy and workable boundary, challenges can be talked about and resolved. To learn more or get the support you need, reach out for a free consultation.  

Dating and creating long-lasting, healthy relationships might just be two of the hardest things we will ever do. Navigating them requires a lot of awareness, and for many of us in the LGBTQIA+ community, the healing from developmental trauma. Knowing your attachment style and how to manage it will also give you a lot of control in relationships. To learn more, scroll through our blog or reach out to us for a free consultation. 

Psychological research has proven, time and time again, that the most powerful component of talk therapy is the relationship that a client has with their therapist. In this light, iAmClinic was started by a queer child who couldn’t find a professional who understood his story, his experiences, and his pain. Therapy with our team of queer or trans therapists can be monumental for your child because we are not only well-trained, professionally competent, but we also have personal experiences that allow your child to be safe, vulnerable, and inspired to be healthy and whole. 

Thankfully, there are numerous evidenced-based modalities that a therapist can use successfully with queer or trans youth. Some of the more common are Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) because it helps teens assess their thought patterns, challenges their traditional ways of decision-making, and helps them develop a mature way of navigating challenges and choices. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a great modality in that it helps adolescents work through big or small traumas, diminish anxiety or depression, and reprocess negative emotions into resilience. Neurofeedback is a powerful tool that helps treat anxiety, depression, ADHD, learning disorders, and behavioral challenges with the use of EEG (electroencephalogram) readings of the brain’s activity. At iAmClinic we are sure to use safe and trusted modalities to help your teen heal and grow. 

Dating and creating long-lasting, healthy relationships might just be two of the hardest things we will ever do. Navigating them requires a lot of awareness, and for many of us in the LGBTQIA+ community, the healing from developmental trauma. Knowing your attachment style and how to manage it will also give you a lot of control in relationships. To learn more, scroll through our blog or reach out to us for a free consultation. 

Absolutely. We are bound by state laws and professional ethics to ensure your child’s confidentiality, no matter the subject matter. Of course, as professional counselors, we are obligated to disclose if the child is at risk of harm, but other than that, your child’s identity and experiences are safe with us. Confidentiality is part of the magic sauce that makes therapy and the therapeutic relationship so powerful. 

As the parent of an LGBTQIA+ child, you have a role no other person can replicate. Being a safe and trustworthy, secure base for your child will give them permission to be open and honest with you, allowing them to find refuge in your safety more than the wonky “safety” of an untrustworthy friend. Taking the time to learn about your child’s experiences and empathizing with their/her/or his inner truth—as opposed to being their rational coach—will give your child a sense of being known, cherished, and…safe. To learn more, please pursue your blog or set up a free consultation. 

We are thrilled to see such a massive upsurge in resources for straight, cisgender parents of LGBTQIA+ children. We recommend pursuing through our blog for insightful, quick reads that will empower you to parent with ease and confidence. We also offer workshops for parents and we collaborated with Jennifer Hatmaker on creating an e-course for parents just like you. Other fantastic resources include The Family Acceptance Project, PFLAG, and Momma Bear Hugs. 

We want to make sure that therapy is accessible so we have built a team of therapists and interns that offer a wide range of fees, giving you more options. To learn more, Nicole, our Intake Specialist, will show you a range of fees and help you find one that fits your budget. 

Thankfully, we have many treatment modalities at our fingertips. Whether it be Neurofeedback, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, Breathwork, somatic therapies, talk therapy, or group therapy, we can assist you in overcoming the challenges that make living out and proud challenging. 

We have found great success in treating depression with modalities like somatic therapies, Breathwork, EMDR, and Neurofeedback, and talk therapy. We also work with a network of nurse practitioners and psychiatrists. 

Have you ever seen a doctor place the sticky pads on a heart-attack patient’s chest to monitor the electrical pulses of the heart? The sticky sensors feed the electrical data to the doctor so treatments and interventions can be determined. We use a very similar system, but ours is called EEG (electroencephalogram) and it measures brain activity. Once we know where and how the brain holds ailments like ADHD, anxiety, learning disorders, or depression, we develop a precise protocol to train the brain into different patterns. When our sensors tell the computer that the brain activity is what we want, the movie screen gets big and the sounds are crisp, thus rewarding the watching client’s brain. The more the brain learns how to receive this reward it continues to fire in this positive way. Over time, with significant training, the brain creates a new setting allowing the new pattern to persist over time. 

The interesting thing about the brain’s zip codes, if you will, is that they control more than one function. As we train one region of the brain we treat several symptoms. In this light, we commonly treat anxiety, depression, ruminating thoughts, a persisting focus on self-hatred or shame, and ADHD. We also treat learning disorders, auditory processing disorders, and many other ailments. As a queer-specific counseling center, we notice that nearly 100% of our clients have either a mild or major inclination to obsess about not being good enough- an intrusive thought-pattern that lives in our cingulate gyrus. It may be said that such a symptom develops as a result of living under the scrutiny—when closeted or out—of trans and/or homophobia. As a result, we are sure to make sure all of our clients live free from the effects of minority strain, from the inside out! Neurofeedback is a great treatment to reset the brain after the developmental effects of heterosexism.

Neurofeedback uses sensors to detect the brain’s activity and we use that information to train the brain into firing differently, creating new patterns of electrical activity. Training the brain to produce different electrical patterns allows the brain to function differently, thus training the brain out of diagnosable disorders like ADHD, anxiety, depression, and OCD. Mindfulness is a way of creating more awareness of and presence with the body. Luminosity helps the body rehearse skills to keep them active. Although mindfulness and luminosity helps the body regulate itself and preserve skills, neurofeedback helps treat diagnosable disorders. 

Absolutely. We are bound by state laws and professional ethics to ensure your child’s confidentiality, no matter the subject matter. Of course, as professional counselors, we are obligated to disclose if the child is at risk of harm, but other than that, your child’s identity and experiences are safe with us. Confidentiality is part of the magic sauce that makes therapy and the therapeutic relationship so powerful. 

Yes, neurofeedback is a precise way of treating ailments like ADHD, anxiety, depression and PTSD. We target where and how those concerns are produced in the brain, show that information to the brain, and then show the brain another way of behaving. Neurofeedback is painless and quite easy. All you do is allow us to put sensors on your scalp and then all you do is watch a movie in a quiet room. Our computer gives all the information to your brain that it needs to train itself. Neurofeedback is like giving your brain a mirror to observe itself and adapt with a little coaching. 

When selecting a therapist, it’s important to consider their experience and specialization in working with neurodivergent individuals, their approach to understanding neurodiversity, accommodations for sensory sensitivities, therapeutic techniques, collaboration with clients, cultural competence, community resources, communication methods, client feedback, and logistical considerations.

Seek information about sensory-friendly office environments, remote or teletherapy options, and accommodations for diverse communication styles and mobility challenges.

Inquire about the therapist’s familiarity with approaches like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), Neurofeedback, and other evidence-based methods relevant to neurodiversity.

Look for evidence of the therapist’s cultural competence and understanding of how intersections with race, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other aspects of identity may impact the experiences of neurodivergent individuals.

Discuss the therapist’s communication methods, flexibility in using alternative communication means, and establishment of boundaries to ensure a supportive and respectful therapeutic relationship.

Look for a therapist who demonstrates an understanding of consensual non-monogamy, has experience working with polyamorous clients, and actively seeks ongoing education and training in this field.

Therapy can play a vital role in providing support, guidance, and a safe space for individuals and couples to navigate the complexities of polyamorous relationships, addressing emotional and interpersonal challenges.

An ENM or polyamory-affirmative therapist can connect clients with ENM/polyamory support groups and resources in their area, providing valuable community-based support.

Specialized couples counseling with an ENM (Ethical Non-monogamy) or polyamory-affirming therapist can facilitate open conversations about sexual, emotional, and physical trauma, empowering partners to navigate complex dynamics with empathy and understanding.

Therapists specializing in open relationships and polyamory can provide valuable guidance and support for individuals navigating the process of coming out, offering a safe space to explore personal identity and relationships.

An ENM/polyamory-affirming therapist demonstrates a specific understanding and acceptance of consensual non-monogamy, providing targeted support and guidance tailored to the unique dynamics of polyamorous relationships.

Therapy provides a supportive environment for exploring emotions, fostering effective communication, and addressing interpersonal challenges within open or polyamorous dynamics, helping individuals and partners navigate their relationships with strong communication, empathy and resilience.

  • Polyamorous: Polyamory refers to the practice of engaging in multiple consensual, emotional, and intimate relationships simultaneously, with the knowledge and consent of all partners involved. It is characterized by a focus on building meaningful connections, fostering emotional intimacy, and often involves open communication about the existence of multiple partners. Polyamorous individuals prioritize ethical and transparent relationships, emphasizing trust, respect, and consent within each dynamic.
  • Hookups: Hookups typically refers to engaging in casual sexual encounters or relationships with multiple partners without the expectation of emotional attachment or long-term commitment. It often involves a lack of exclusivity or emotional involvement, focusing primarily on sexual experiences rather than deep emotional connections. Hookups are not primarily rooted in the establishment of committed, long-term relationships and may involve a more casual approach to sexual interactions.

The question of whether polyamory is a choice or an inherent identity has been the subject of much discussion and debate. Various perspectives exist, highlighting the complexity of this issue:

  1. Polyamory as an Identity: Some individuals within the polyamorous community view their lifestyle and capacity for multiple simultaneous relationships as an integral part of their personal identity. They may express that being polyamorous is not simply a lifestyle choice but a fundamental aspect of who they are, similar to how one might identify with a specific sexual orientation.
  2. Polyamory as a Lifestyle Choice: Others perceive polyamory as a lifestyle choice, emphasizing that it involves deliberate decisions and preferences regarding relationship structures rather than an inherent trait. For some individuals, polyamory represents a chosen approach to relationships that aligns with their values, desires, and relationship goals.
  3. Not a Sexual Orientation: While some people consider polyamory akin to a sexual orientation, many argue that it differs significantly from traditional sexual orientations like heterosexuality or homosexuality. Polyamory is distinct from sexual orientation due to its focus on relationship dynamics and structures rather than solely on sexual attraction.
  4. Ethical Considerations: A key aspect often emphasized within discussions about polyamory is the ethical and consensual nature of such relationships, regardless of whether it is viewed as a choice or an identity. Ethical considerations, such as trust, respect, and consent, are essential components of polyamorous relationships, influencing how individuals perceive and engage in polyamory.

In conclusion, the question of whether polyamory is a choice or an identity reflects diverse viewpoints within the polyamorous community and broader society. This diversity highlights the multifaceted nature of polyamorous relationships and the complex interplay between personal identity, lifestyle choices, and ethical considerations.

Ketamine Assisted Psychotherapy (KAP) involves the use of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, in combination with psychotherapy to treat various mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and PTSD. The therapy session typically begins with the administration of a controlled dose of ketamine followed by psychotherapy to explore thoughts and emotions brought about by the experience.

KAP has shown promising results in rapidly alleviating symptoms of treatment-resistant depression and other mental health disorders. It may provide quick relief compared to traditional antidepressants and can lead to profound insights during therapy sessions.

Cannabis Assisted Psychotherapy (CAP) involves using cannabis, typically in the form of medical marijuana, in conjunction with psychotherapy to address various mental health concerns. Unlike KAP, which uses ketamine, CAP utilizes the medicinal properties of cannabis to facilitate therapeutic breakthroughs.

These therapies are not suitable for everyone. Individuals with a history of psychosis, substance use disorders, or certain medical conditions may not be eligible for these treatments. It’s important to undergo a thorough evaluation by a qualified healthcare professional to determine suitability.

Both KAP and CAP can have potential side effects and risks, including dissociation, increased heart rate, temporary increase in blood pressure (in the case of ketamine), and impaired cognitive function (in the case of cannabis). These should only be administered under the supervision of trained professionals.

It’s crucial to seek out licensed and experienced healthcare providers who specialize in Ketamine or Cannabis Assisted Psychotherapy. They should have the necessary training and expertise to ensure safe and effective treatment.

The legal status of these therapies varies by location. In some regions, ketamine and cannabis may be legally used for therapeutic purposes, while in others, their use may be restricted or prohibited. It’s important to understand the local regulations before seeking out these treatments.

It’s essential to inform healthcare providers about all current treatments and medications being used to ensure there are no potential interactions or contraindications. Integrated care and collaboration between providers are crucial for the safety and effectiveness of these therapies.